DIY Round Farmhouse Dining Table | Modern Builds | EP. 53

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Today on Modern Builds we're making a 6' round farmhouse style dining table using all 2-by and 4-by construction lumber. No complex joinery or special tools required. Be sure to check out the written article for a full materials and supplies list, along with step by step written plans.

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WRITTEN ARTICLE:
http://www.modernbuilds.com/diy-round-farmhouse-dining-table

Doweling Jig: http://goo.gl/xgrQyE
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32 comments

  • VampireOnline

    Are you worried about wood movement?

    • silveravnt

      I hope you update us on how this does this summer. If I remember correctly you are in a very hot humid environment. I hope all the wood expands at the same rate with no problems.

    • Anna Redd

      I was wondering the same thing, Thanks for this thread

    • Abel Pulido

      It’s a beautiful table but the top will warp come summer season when the wood can’t expand. Look into how to properly install breadboards. That’ll give you an idea on how to fix it

    • VampireOnline

      Build the outer ring with a rabbet in the center then cut the 2x4s with rabbets to fit in that ring. Screw it down from underneath. Maybe not glue them together just to give them a little bit of movement.

    • Modern Builds

      Hmmm, I got ya. What do you recommend I should’ve done instead?

  • Kalleb Kole

    I watch these cause he’s so attractive!

  • Ben Muirhead

    The expansion/contraction of the middle section is going to destroy this table after a few seasons.

    • Robert Cornelius

      Ben: I cringe every time I see projects thrown together without taking in to consideration that wood will expand and contract. I’m glad to see I’m not the only one.

    • Ben Muirhead

      There are lots of options. The most obvious in this case would be to not surround the center portion. The joined lumber could then expand and contract without issue. The second would be to use plywood or some other dimensionally stable wood for the top instead of 2x4s. If the wood were arranged differently, like the spokes of a wheel instead of side by side, there would be much less movement overall.

      There is nothing wrong with screw-based joinery as long as you know how wood moves and you don’t constrain it. This is going to be a problem on this table where he attached the base to the top as well. He should have used oversized holes or some sort of attachment bracket (ie z-clip) to allow the top to move independently of the bottom.

    • Bunta Yaj

      Ben Muirhead I’m familiar with rectangular shaped table top expansion (I’ve built it wrong before and seen the results of my carelessness). upon my education on woodworking, I despise screw joints now… only when I absolutely need to or if I’m in a hurry or if I’m not worried about cosmetics. How would you build a circular tabletop taking into account of moisture effects? especially when dealing the outside rim part?

  • Rick Deckard

    Great job! would love to see a custom computer U-desk with hutch.

  • Shiona Rae

    I love that your dog is just chilling as you install the table

  • Manuel L

    I cringe so hard at battery operated power tools other than drills and impacts but aside from that love your vids!

  • The Cutting Bored

    Hey Mike, question for you on this specific build.

    I’m actually about to do a barn door for someone using framing lumber that will be glued up horizontally (think just horizontal rows of 2 x 8s – and similar to how you’ve built the table top). I’ll plane it down ever so slightly just to flatten/smooth it before gluing up, but the rounded edges won’t be totally removed from each piece. I’ll then do a similar glue up with dowels and clamping method you have. When you went to belt sand the surface down, did you run into issues not being able to get all of the glue off that remained in the cracks or did this become negligible once you conditioned and stained?

    Basically only have a single weekend to my project so just weighing the pros and cons of the dowel glue up method currently.

    Cheers dude.

  • Ranna Wolasmal

    I love this type of table. It’s so chic!

  • Robert Cornelius

    From an older guy… can you slow your video down just a hair. I like watching you, but the video is just too fast for me.

    • Robert Cornelius

      Note to viewers: This is not fine furniture, so do expect some slight gaps between joints as the wood dries out. Fun project to build, though.

  • scott mclean

    how about a drop down fold away Murphy table for your next project

  • chococo Chen

    This is the perfect table I wanted for my bedroom, anyone in Toronto can do this?

  • RetroWeld

    🙂

  • Stephen Hankinson

    do u have the dimensions of the table

  • dleff

    What boots you wearing at the end

  • Malik Chemnitz

    Could you elaborate on the receiving holes and the finish penetration?

  • Ji Sun Paschal

    This is so random but the pekinese looks exactly like Simon and Martina’s dog, Spudgy

  • Claudia Mandiola

    Me encantó!!!

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